The Myth of the Napoleon Guitar

 Introduction

Recently I’ve been doing some research upon the introduction of the guitar to Australia in the early nineteenth century. Compara­tively little scholarly (or other) work has appeared on the subject and what has been done treats the early colonial period in a fairly desul­tory manner. A surviving Romantic-era guitar that possibly was brought to New South Wales c. 1824–33 has received periodic media attention over the years as it supposedly was owned by Napoleon Bonaparte.

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Andrew Cunningham’s 1870 Captain Thunderbolt Photographs

On 25 May 1870 the bush­ranger Frederick Ward (also known as Thunder­bolt or Captain Thunder­bolt) was shot and killed by a police trooper named Alexander Walker at Kentucky Creek, near Uralla, in northern New South Wales. In the following days an Armidale photo­grapher named Andrew Cun­ningham captured at least ten photo­graphs pertaining to Ward’s death. These included three relatively well known images of Ward’s corpse and two portraits of Alexander Walker (see Figure 2 below).

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The All England Eleven’s 1861-62 Australian Tour and Early Cricket Photography at the Sydney Domain

Introduction

The All England cricket team’s tour of 1861–62 generated unprecedented interest and excitement in the Australian colonies. Cricket’s popularity had increased from the mid 1850s, when regular inter-colonial matches began, and when Victoria and (to a lesser extent) New South Wales (nsw) were transformed by gold rushes. In 1861 two Melbourne restaurateurs, Felix Spiers and Christopher Pond, contracted a team of English professionals captained by H.H. Stephenson to tour Australia.

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Early Hydroelectric Installations in Colonial Australia

Introduction

While major Australian hydroelectric developments in the twentieth century (particularly the Snowy Mountains Scheme) have received considerable attention from historians, this short essay looks at the very earliest colonial hydroelectric instal­la­tions. In order to keep the survey manageable I’ve limited it to the first six examples which were all built for electric lighting purposes in the 1880s.

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